The Arc of Protection Draft Open for Commentary

Leah Zamore and I have completed a book manuscript entitled The Arc of Protection: Toward a New International Refugee Regime.  The book, in draft, is being published on Public Seminar, a New School website. We are publishing the book in draft because we would welcome a discussion of the issues, including criticisms and corrections now--before it goes between hard covers. The Public Seminar site will publish comments and discussion points (as indicated at the bottom of each post). We'd be delighted to hear from you.

Zero Draft of the Global Compact on Refugees Released: Discussion

UNHCR has released the "Zero Draft" of the Global Compact on Refugees.  I would like to start a thread for commenting on the draft.  What's in the draft of significance; what's left out?  What amendments would you propose? What is the likelihood of state adoption?  Let's get a conversation going.

The Uneven Production of Illegality: A Response to The Daily’s ‘The Sheriff Bind’

The association of violent criminality with immigration crops up time and time again across the popular and political press. Last Monday’s coverage on the New York Times Daily, which focused on the bind sheriffs face when asked by ICE to impose detainers on “illegal immigrants,” unfortunately takes up this characterization.

New UNHCR Report on (Lack of) Educational Opportunities for Refugees

Comments on the new UNHCR report on educational opportunities for refugees.

Opening the Door to a New Solution

Today, there are over 65.3 million forcibly displaced people worldwide. Of those, over 21 million are refugees. 21 million individuals have been forced to move from their homes in search of safety elsewhere. In our world today, refugees move through borders and swim through oceans; in Mohsin Hamid’s world in Exit West, refugees move by stepping through doors.

Casablanca—a refugee story par excellence—celebrates its 75th birthday

If Casablanca were made today—at the height of the greatest refugee crisis World War II—what would it look like? To celebrate 75 years of the classic, The New School hosted a screening and discussion of the film titled, “Casablanca at 75: A Refugee Story.” Noah Isenberg, a professor at Lang College and author of, We’ll Always Have Casablanca: The Life, Legend, and Afterlife of Hollywood’s Most Beloved Movie, was joined by Alexander Aleinikoff, the director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility, and New York Times film critic, A.O. Scott. In their discussion, the particular focus on the refugee aspect of the film brought up several topical and intriguing points that asked attendees to imagine what the film would look like and whether or not it would have the same impact.

New Report Released on Refugee Compacts to Address Protracted Displacement

The Center for Global Development and the International Rescue Committee have teamed up to produce an interesting report: Refugee Compacts: Addressing the Crisis of Protracted Displacement. (Full disclosure: I was a member of the Study Group for the Report). This excerpt from the Executive Summary provides the central conclusion: Compact agreements have emerged as a new approach, bringing together donors and development and humanitarian actors under host-country leadership for multiyear agreements to achieve defined, sustainable outcomes for refugees and host communities. Under a compact framework, diverse actors make mutually reinforcing commitments to resources, policy changes, and projects designed to achieve a shared vision.

Roadmap for Drafting the Global Compact on Refugees Released: A Look at the CRRF

UNHCR has released a "non-paper" on its plan for drafting the Global Compact on Refugees. Last year's New York Declaration charged UNHCR with presenting a draft Compact for consideration by the General Assembly in 2018. An Annex to the Declaration described the elements of a "Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF)," which is to be the central feature of the Compact.

Review and Commentary: Resolving Policy Conundrums: Enhancing Humanitarian Protection in Southeast Asia by Marie McAuliffe

In Resolving Policy Conundrums: Enhancing Humanitarian Protection in Southeast Asia, Marie McAuliffe presents a case study on the policy responses to the May 2015 crisis as context for “discussions of humanitarian protection in Southeast Asia, and of Rohingya maritime migrants in particular.” (p. 4). This post reviews the findings of the report and provides further observations by drawing on recent developments in the region.