What does the Supreme Court’s decision on the Trump Executive Order mean for refugees?

 The commentary on the Supreme Court’s decision on the Trump Executive Orders has largely focused on the part of the Orders that imposed the travel ban on six predominantly Muslim countries.  Less noticed has been the paragraphs at the end of the decision that discuss the Orders’ suspension of the refugee program.

It’s All About that Stay (and Its Surprising Limits)

Here's a thoughtful take from Marty Lederman on the Supreme Court's decision today on the Trump Executive Orders. We will have a post soon on the implications of the decision for the refugee program.

Why Are There No Syrian Refugee Camps in Lebanon?

Since the Syrian conflict began in 2011, its neighbor Lebanon quickly became the country that hosts the highest number of refugee per capita; today one in four is a refugee. Initially, Lebanon had an open-border with Syria. Between 2013 and 2014, UNHCR registered on average over 48,000 refugees per month. Despite the massive influx, Lebanon did not create refugee camps for Syrians.

Focus on Refugee Skills to Move Beyond Arguments About Resettlement

In a June 12 speech to governments and NGOs at UNHCR’s annual consultations on refugee resettlement in Geneva, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi made a passionate plea for additional resettlement pledges from participating nations. He will likely be disappointed.

Trump Tweets on his Travel Ban–what does DOJ do now?

President Trump's tweets this morning are truly remarkable and must be giving fits to Department of Justice attorneys--not to mention his Press Secretary and Cabinet Secretaries who have repeatedly asserted that the Executive Orders do not constitute a "ban."

US Refugee Admissions resume, and another loss in court for the Trump Executive Orders

Two items worth noting. First, the State Department has again begun processing for refugee admissions, despite President Trump's Executive Order putting the program on hold and capping admissions for the current fiscal year at 50,000. Second, the Federal Court of Appeals for Fourth Circuit issued a scathing opinion affirming (nearly all parts of) a lower court's preliminary injunction against the revised Trump Order.

MPI Paper on a Global Broadband Plan for Refugees and Refugee-hosting Areas

Blair Levin, Paul De Sa, and I have written a paper, just published by the Migration Policy Institute, that lays out a strategy for increasing connectivity for refugees and the communities that host them. Read it here.

Event: Sanctuary Cities, Freedom Cities, a Conversation

Join the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility for a discussion with leading experts on the concept and practice of sanctuary. To receive the link for the webinar, please register via this Eventbrite page.

Miriam Ticktin on “The Sanctuary Movement and Women’s Rights: Sister Struggles”

I recommend Miriam Ticktin's interesting comment that points the way toward a broader concept of "sanctuary," which includes this thought-provoking paragraph:

From Refugee Law to Global Migration Law

The idea of "international migration law" is not new, but it is receiving increased attention from a number of legal scholars. In some degree, they are responding to the domination of refugee law in discussions of international law relating to the movement of people. AJIL Unbound (the online edition of the American Journal of International Law) has recently published a "Symposium on Framing Global Migration Law," in which Jaya Ramji-Nogales has a piece well-worth reading: "Moving Beyond the Refugee Law Paradigm."