MPI Paper on a Global Broadband Plan for Refugees and Refugee-hosting Areas

Blair Levin, Paul De Sa, and I have written a paper, just published by the Migration Policy Institute, that lays out a strategy for increasing connectivity for refugees and the communities that host them. Read it here.

Event: Sanctuary Cities, Freedom Cities, a Conversation

Join the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility for a discussion with leading experts on the concept and practice of sanctuary. To receive the link for the webinar, please register via this Eventbrite page.

Miriam Ticktin on “The Sanctuary Movement and Women’s Rights: Sister Struggles”

I recommend Miriam Ticktin's interesting comment that points the way toward a broader concept of "sanctuary," which includes this thought-provoking paragraph:

From Refugee Law to Global Migration Law

The idea of "international migration law" is not new, but it is receiving increased attention from a number of legal scholars. In some degree, they are responding to the domination of refugee law in discussions of international law relating to the movement of people. AJIL Unbound (the online edition of the American Journal of International Law) has recently published a "Symposium on Framing Global Migration Law," in which Jaya Ramji-Nogales has a piece well-worth reading: "Moving Beyond the Refugee Law Paradigm."

New Report Released on Refugee Compacts to Address Protracted Displacement

The Center for Global Development and the International Rescue Committee have teamed up to produce an interesting report: Refugee Compacts: Addressing the Crisis of Protracted Displacement. (Full disclosure: I was a member of the Study Group for the Report). This excerpt from the Executive Summary provides the central conclusion: Compact agreements have emerged as a new approach, bringing together donors and development and humanitarian actors under host-country leadership for multiyear agreements to achieve defined, sustainable outcomes for refugees and host communities. Under a compact framework, diverse actors make mutually reinforcing commitments to resources, policy changes, and projects designed to achieve a shared vision.

New Study on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse of Migrant Children in Greece

The Harvard FXB Center has published an important and troubling report: Emergency within an Emergency:  The Growing Epidemic of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse of Migrant Children in Greece.  It is co-authored by Vasileia Digidiki and Jacqueline Bhabha.

Labor Migration as an Alternative Pathway for Refugees

Despite the growing scale of forced displacement, it is increasingly clear that traditional durable solutions are only working for a limited number of refugees across the globe. The realization of durable solutions for refugees remains bleak: repatriation is often not possible due to persistent insecurity and weak governance; host countries continue to resist or restrict opportunities for local integration; and resettlement slots remain limited to less than 1% of the global refugee population. In recent years, academics have argued that continued emphasis on these three solutions “fails to recognize a fundamental need to move away from understanding all solutions simply in terms of ‘fixing’ people in places.”

New factsheet published on Global Compacts from the Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law

The Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law has prepared a useful Factsheet on the refugee and migrant global compacts. Take a look here.

Displaced from Countries that Don’t Exist: IDPs, Refugees, and Frozen Conflicts

What happens to people displaced from countries that don’t exist? Those displaced from ISIS- or Donetsk People's Republic (DNR)-controlled territories have had to confront this very question. They are, as a technical matter, categorized as Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) rather than refugees, due to international non-recognition of the states from which they have been displaced; and as such, these individuals have been particularly affected by the lack of consensus on how to deal with IDPs. The experiences of individuals displaced during now-frozen conflicts following the fall of communist regimes in the Balkans and Caucasus suggest that they are unlikely to enjoy many of the legal protections afforded to refugees. The combination of a weak international legal regime to govern IDPs and de jure states’ political disincentives to integrate them suggests that they will not enjoy such protections until either a legally binding IDP regime is developed or the frozen conflicts become resolved.

The Right to Information: Expanding Access for Refugees

War zones, and the paths along which people flee them, are sites of abundant rumor and few certainties. Parties to a conflict may have a strategic interest in spreading misinformation and rumors, while hostilities may have disrupted the ordinary flows of news from independent organizations. Yet even affected people who have managed to flee conflict as refugees may find little clarity. While host nations may not actively spread rumors, they may have little incentive to correct ambiguities over important facts like deadlines to apply for asylum. And generally speaking, refugees find themselves in countries where they do not know the language and whose media are not oriented towards providing them with information.